: Is L.A. Noire A Glimpse Of The Future?

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Is L.A. Noire A Glimpse Of The Future?

While I mentioned it in my review (and I'll probably touch on it during my video commentary, which you'll see in a matter of days), I believe this intriguing subject is worthy of a separate article.

There is nothing revolutionary about the action-based gameplay in L.A. Noire and in fact, that aspect of Team Bondi's impressive achievement actually feels outdated in comparison to the facial recognition technology, which is the clear focus. That being said, those faces alone can indeed be considered revolutionary. As this industry continues to progress, it's critical that we find a way to more fully embrace the reality of humanity. Think about how stories have taken a bigger role in our interactive experiences; then, think about how we interact with one another in real life.

The acting in games like Heavy Rain and Uncharted 2: Among Thieves is great, but despite all our fancy hardware and developmental advances, the characterization still relies heavily upon the voice actors. In truth, when we speak to others, the majority of communication occurs without words; you know that old saying, "90% of communication is non-verbal." That's absolutely true and if we are to capture the essence of emotion and human drama in video games, we needed another push forward. We needed to emphasize the faces. We needed a technology that can manage to do this.

Hence, MotionScan. I'm not saying it's the answer to the future but it's a definite start. They also picked just the right setting for its debut; placing gamers in the role of a character who must interpret faces on a daily basis. Lives can even depend on those expressions. It wouldn't have been nearly as amazing had such tech been applied to a game that doesn't highlight the need for it. Actually, it's almost as if they wanted to send a message; to say- "Look what we can do now...imagine the ways in which it can be used in the future."

5/20/2011 Ben Dutka

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Comments (58 posts)

Pandacastro
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 9:54:48 PM
Reply

Can other developers use the technology in LA Noire for the faces or to they have to ask team bondi?

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Lawless SXE
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:07:48 PM

As far as I'm aware, it's not proprietary to Team Bondi, but a third party company. By all means, any other dev should be free to license the technology and use it in their games.

EDIT: Yep, MotionScan belongs to Depth Analysis.

Last edited by Lawless SXE on 5/20/2011 10:10:22 PM

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BikerSaint
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:09:17 PM

Any developer can use their own Mo-Cap if they have the funds to do so.

Otherwise I guess they could go ahead & ask Team Bondi if they're willing lease their whole Mo-Cap set-up system out(that is if TB actually owns theirs).

Last edited by BikerSaint on 5/20/2011 10:10:16 PM

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bigrailer19
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 3:50:05 AM

I read for instance today, that ND doesn't use it because of how large it makes files, and that they can't edit it. They like to edit their work and using motion scan makes that difficult. Check out the other article Ben put up about ND and uncharted 3's mocap, then head over to the PSBlog to read the interview with ND it's ery interesting.

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Snaaaake
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:11:52 PM
Reply

I think the best tech this year probably belongs to LA Noire and Uncharted 3.
By the looks of things so far, not even RAGE or Battlefield 3 has anything on them.

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Lawless SXE
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:20:44 PM

The tech in Rage and BF3 though has a different focus. Rage is all about the graphical prowess and full HD at 60fps. It's about pushing the hardware to get the pixel count.

Frostbite 2.0 is about more fluid animations and the destructibility over anything else.

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Lawless SXE
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:16:17 PM
Reply

It really does depend on how it's used. I mean, this tech in concert with a story like Heavy Rain, where emotion is really needed would be brilliant. Combining it with full-body mo-cap to get every little tic would be a massive step forward, and when used in conjunction with the myriad of input options of a device like the NGP, it could provide with a really intense experience. We must remember that advancements in hardware and software MUST be inextricably linked for advancement in immersion.

Though taking this tech and applying it to something like CoD, where the story and characters are completely forgettable is just a waste. There is a certain place for this technology, and it is this place that I hope that games are heading to, or at least a splinter set of games. Also, Heavy Rain and L.A. Noire may be very different, but I believe that they may be placed together under the new category of game that's been mentioned on this site before: Intellectual. It may not be massively popular, but it is a necessary step for games, IMO.
Peace.

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Qubex
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 2:31:03 AM

Lawless, I agree with you for the most part, but remember, an FPS could have a deep and engaging story line with very advanced cut scenes. I mean, even if the story is not that deep, motion scanning would make a big difference in at least making the characters look better... and not puppet like.

This is important I think, the story may be shallow, but to have characters that look realistic and at least talk correctly would make * some * difference to the overall look and quality of graphical presentation.

Regarding story line, I quite liked Modern Warfare One. I thought the story was not bad at all and quite engaging. It kept me going to complete the game.

Anyway, we will see how this technology progresses and where we end up in the next few years. By the time the PS4 rolls around... it will be a different world of video gaming...

Q!

"play.experience.enjoy"

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Lawless SXE
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 2:59:47 AM

Qubex,
I ddo agree that an FPS COULD have a great, emotional storyline, it is simply that they have not yet reached anything approaching that. But yes, you are correct in suggesting that having near realism in the actions and expressions of characters would go a long way towards bringing the story to life, no matter how poorly it is written (not implying MW is bad, I haven't played it, but BlOps certainly was a poor effort). But I don't mean to generalise all FPSs to this low standard, or indeed to separate them from any other genre, as there are some real stinkers out there.

The future is bright indeed, and not just in the world of gaming.
Peace.

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Bloodysilence19
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:18:17 PM
Reply

the faces of the characters in la noire is great, but its nothing new to me. its not the best example but look at ufc 2010 the faces looks exactly like the real person. for the motion the faces do in la noire is impressive but you gotta look at heavy rain the motions in the faces are just as good imo. mainly its the voice actor along with the face reg and motion scan that makes la noire stand out.

Last edited by Bloodysilence19 on 5/20/2011 10:19:43 PM

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rogers71
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 12:21:46 AM

Come on now....You are comparing a UFC game with the innovative genius that is LA Noire. It is extremely easy to make faces that look exactly like their human counterparts when there is nothing else involved. Now try to take an actors face, put it in a game and have it show emotion, wrinkles, expressions etc.

Even Heavy Rain was limited in the facial expressions compared to LA Noire. I will have to adamantly disagree with you on this one. Don't get me wrong, the facial tech that was used in this game was definitely inspired by Heavy Rain but Team Bondi took it to a whole other level. You can have your opinion back now.

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Bloodysilence19
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 1:51:12 AM

why you think i said it isn't the best example read first. second i said the faces of la noire isn't as impressive cause like you said its easy to recreate someone face which pretty much what team bondi did in la noire with the actors.

now with you saying the wrinkles, show emotion etc goes with the motion of the face which i said was impressive in la noire. of course heavy was limited in emotions of the face, just like la noire was. your not going to get every detail of the persons movement/emotion good luck with that. good ill keep my opinion just like you can keep your opinion

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dkmrules
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:28:21 PM
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Yeah, this is the future for sure! I just got the game today, and my god the facial animations are simply stunning. Shame I cant use the pre-order goodies until the playstation store is back up..... Oh well certainly beats having three disks.

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Kiryu
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:33:05 PM
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The Next Quantic Dream Game will blow our minds.People saying it has Graphics and motion capture as good as Avatar.
Full Face and Body Capture done at once.
I hope they show it at this year's Gamescom.

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Lawless SXE
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:38:47 PM

No! E3... GamesCom is too long away.

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Kiryu
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:41:02 PM

i think it won't be at E3.

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Oyashiro
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:48:59 PM

I think David Cage already confirmed that he will be revealing one of the two games QD is working on at the Sony Presser.

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Lawless SXE
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:54:05 PM

Nor do I, but I want it to be there, if only in teaser form. It'll have been almost a year and a half since their last release, and Sony seems to be pushing a quick turnover from their first and second party studios after their first game for the system. Keeping that in mind, it's entirely feasible that their next project could release around E3 next year, and the hype train for Sony's games tends to last around a year, judging by what we've seen over this last couple. GDC is more likely though, or even PAX.
Peace.

:O:O:O Don't you be getting my hopes up, Oyashiro!

Last edited by Lawless SXE on 5/20/2011 10:58:00 PM

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FM23
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 2:46:26 AM

HA...honestly Kiryu, why do you have to bring this up. It's like you don't like when non-PS3 exclusives receive attention or something.

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FM23
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 8:10:23 PM

Thumb me down, but its true people.

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bigrailer19
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 9:33:17 PM

Well while I can't really say his intentions. I will say that while we are talking about a great move for gaming, there are other developers out their not just trying to be on the same level but take it to the next. The title of the article reads "is LA noire a glimpse at the future?" so he brings up a good point. Especially when asked is this the future of gaming when other developers are trying other avenues of development?

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kraygen
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:53:16 PM
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I'm looking forward to full body motion scan tech that is equal to or better than what LA Noire has done, because while I agree that most conversation is not verbal, a lot of it is done with the body not just the face.

We are a people who love hand gestures, we tap our feet, shift our weight, and I don't think it'll be long before we that kind of definition in our video games.

It's a great time to be a gamer.

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Lawless SXE
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 11:21:38 PM

One small potential problem with that is that those non-verbal cues can translate into distrust within our minds when it could simply be the result of discomfort. There is a very fine line between realistic and overly realistic, and that cannot be crossed if future developments are made in line with what Team Bondi have started here.
Peace.

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FxTales
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 10:58:41 PM
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Games already are more enthralling than film, at least they have been for me, and with this evolving it's looking to be an exciting future for gaming and we'll get to witness it.

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Lawless SXE
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 11:23:47 PM

In many cases I'd agree with you, but if you want to take a break and experience a story without straining yourself too much, then nothing beats a film. I prefer novels but reading demands far more attention than watching, and gaming doesn't usually give you the same high calibre of tale.

There is yet further to go, but recent advancements have shown that we're getting close.
Peace.

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Beamboom
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 3:24:35 AM

Games will coexist with movies and novels for as long as humans have eyes. They have distinct differences that simply can not be replaced by the other two.
They are not and will never be full substitutes for eachother.

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Alienange
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 11:09:48 PM
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I too agree that it is the perfect setting to debut the technology. The interesting thing is that the game came first. Not that the dev wanted to shoehorn this tech into a game somehow, but that the dev was making a detective game from the start. It was the game that demanded the tech and not the other way around. Rather than ignoring the game's demands, TB went out and found what was necessary to make it work. They truly are to be commended for creative thinking.

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Lawless SXE
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 11:26:31 PM

Indeed Alienange. In too many instances we've seen games that act as little more than tech demos (Star Wars: TFU for DMM and GTA IV for Euphoria spring to mind), rather than providing us with a compelling experience that uses the technology to provide the oomph for the developers intent. I'm not saying that it isn't good to overload your game with brand new tech, just as long as it doesn't take the focus away from the game.
Peace.

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StangMan80
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 11:24:54 PM
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I'm not sure how far this technology will go, but L.A. Noire is an amazing looking game.
But I'm still recovering from a concussion(Football accident at school)..
But this game looks so real because of the faces. They're games out there with better graphics but Because they don't have the faces, expressions and body posture correct it looks like a video game and that jumps out at you instantly.

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Mog
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 11:27:43 PM
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Team Bondi is Australian right?
It's about time my country steps up in making good games!

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Lawless SXE
Friday, May 20, 2011 @ 11:35:52 PM

TOO RIGHT! Although... Bioshock and its sequel were both partly developed here as well as de Blob 2. Australia needs more game studios.

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Fane1024
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 12:14:19 AM

Too bad EA closed Pandemic (which had a studio in Brisbane). They had a string of good games.

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Geobaldi
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 12:07:49 AM
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Though the facial animations are great they are still behind when compared to this technology:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pZTN-jRRM30

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BikerSaint
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 12:47:42 AM

Wow, that's awesome.
I'd love to see some games start coming out now with that tech.

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Lairfan
Monday, May 23, 2011 @ 5:29:56 PM

That's pretty awesome right there.

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Kiryu
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 12:25:42 AM
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One thing i like about Naughty Dog's Motion Capture process is they make the faces of the characters imaginary.Nathan Drake,Elena,Sully,Lazarevich,Navarro faces are not available in the real world to motion capture.
I like the idea of making imaginary faces look more real.

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Highlander
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 12:38:29 AM

I agree completely. The problem I have with the way this has been described in LA Noire is that the actors are very clearly recognizable. I don't know why, but to me that makes it less of a game, it becomes too close to a movie, or real, and less like a game. I think that as we get closer to capturing every twitch and micro-gesture in a person's face, we push the game too far towards real, and it becomes unreal. It becomes unreal because either the game is simply replaying a loop of captured expression, or it always uses the same identical facial response. We humans are very complex creatures. As Ben says 90% of communication is non verbal which is why communication through email or telephone is more difficult that the face to face communication that we all prefer. Complex human display a rainbow of expressions, micro expressions, twitches and gestures all in clusters or torrents. Since the game cannot accurately simulate a real person, it relies on the expression list it is programmed with. What that means is that you will eventually notice and when you do, the characters become as plastic as the next guy. It shatters the illusion of reality. I personally think that in some ways, the principle ought to be less is more - when it comes to attempts to make the characters fundamentally real.

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Qubex
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 2:36:01 AM

Highlander, you raise some interesting points, however the whole objective of the technological push forward to is to make it feel you are playing an interactive movie, with Avatar scene complexity and realism.

If I could immerse myself in a Star Wars game that felt like the movies, had that level of detail, flying in and out of Star Destroyers or along Death Star trenches - in 3D - can you imagine the buzz...

Or swooping in and out the forests of Pandora, floating past mountains suspended in mid air and diving through huge water falls as if it were real.

That is what I want... we may get glimpse of this when the PS4 comes out, but realistically... Avatar style "real-time" graphic detail in games will come 10 to 15 years from now.

Q!

"play.experience.enjoy"

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Highlander
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 3:04:54 AM

Qubex,

If you're talking about the environment, the effects, the in-game objects and physics, I'm right there with you. My concern is about people in games, the people the gamer interacts with in a game.

It's extremely difficult to create a convincing facsimile of a human being because we do not react the same way every time or loop certain expressions or gestures, as an artificial person would. I've seen it done well (uncharted for example) and I've seen it done badly in any number of games where the people look too real and somehow 'plastic'. Anyway, it's just an opinion, but I do think that doing less is more, and vice versa, when it comes to emulating humans in games.

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godsman
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 9:16:42 AM

I don't know if you guys have seen the voice actors from Uncharted 2. They look nothing like the characters other than some similarities. Drake was played by a shorter and fatter actor, victor sullivan was played by a fat bald guy, Chloe is old. None of them are lookers other Elena, and she looks nothing like the character.

My point is that the Uncharted voices are awesome and fits the story really well. If they use the LA Noire facial capture, they'll need to find characters that can look and act, which are impossible.

Sometimes the voice actors have to breathe a certain way create a higher voice or a twitch the lower jaw to churn out a specific pitch. These are all possible in Uncharted because the faces are not recorded, only the body and voice.

For LA Noire, it's restricting on the actor's freedom to express themselves. LA Noire face captures are actually done on an "execution chair" where only the head is recorded. Scenes when police officers talk to you looks super real, but when they turn around and walk away looks like a floating head on a flag pole.

The LA Noire technology is definitely awesome and fits the gameplay 100%. I bought it Day 1. Do I want to see it in other games like Heavy Rain and Uncharted? No. I prefer the more realistic look of being less realistic, if you know what I mean.

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___________
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 3:06:22 AM
Reply

no.
allot of developers are saying that because its too costly, and too time consuming.
i dont like it either, everything looks like its made out of wax!
much prefer the animation used in uncharted or heavy rain.

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Highlander
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 4:57:02 PM

Agreed!

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Beamboom
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 3:43:58 AM
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... and if this indeed is a glimpse of the future (as I have stated elsewhere I sure hope so) then this also has a huge impact on the future hardware specs.

A game console becomes more than just a graphics engine, there will be a lot more computing required *behind* the visual display. And that can only be a good thing imo. Just imagine what the additional data power can be used for, things that is too much for the cpus today!
The open worlds could have the capacity to in realtime calculate the actions of several other inhabitants in the game all across the map, each one with their own non-scripted little life...! This is just a question of several simultaneous processes - raw data processing power. *Now* we can start talking about "good AI" :)

So, motion tech being used ingame or not, these new requirements that require more than just pixels and frame rates will be good for *all* genres.


Last edited by Beamboom on 5/21/2011 3:51:24 AM

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sawao_yamanaka
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 3:53:26 AM
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As much as I like the game I don't think the technology is quite there yet. I think uncharted 2 has better animation and I say this because have you guys noticed their bodies? Besides their heads and hands there is very little movement going on in their bodies. It seems very off and awkward.

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Lawless SXE
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 4:00:15 AM

That's where the limitations of this tech pop up. It's designed almost exclusively for facial capture, and comes at the expense of gross motor functions.

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Beamboom
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 4:30:43 AM

... with the processing power of today, yes. But who knows what tomorrow will bring.

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Lawless SXE
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 4:42:00 AM

No, Beamboom. The flaws of MotionScan lie in the way that it captures the data, not in the strength of the consoles. It may be true that they're being pushed incredibly hard in an effort to create this experience, but that doesn't mean that they are incapable of the fluidity of true human movement at the same time. MotionScan serves a single purpose, and that is not full-body mo-cap.

The technology of tomorrow needs to be able to capture both aspects of human behaviour for it to be displayed virtually, and that requires new developments outside of the realm of video games.
Peace.

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Beamboom
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 5:20:19 AM

If they are able to scan the smallest little twitch in the corner of an actors eye then surely they must be able to collect data for the rest of the body too, theoretically speaking?
I can't understand anything else than that it's all a question of processing power cause one thing is collecting the data, a totally different challenge is using it...

The 3D animations in gaming today is built on a very simple "ragdoll-like" model of the world, using a 3d skeleton framework with some very basic physical variables like weight, reflection and transparency, wrapped up in a "dead" 2d skin. Everything else is scripted animations, like for instance the movement of a coat - that's why the coat moves in the *exact* same way each time the hero turns around, or sticks out like some surf board regardless of how the rest of the body has moved, after a crash or something.
To do anything else simply is too much work by todays standards. To have "motion points" all over the coat would make the console kneel before moving a step.

Because of the insane focus on the simple action graphics the consoles are made able to puke out flat 3d images in glorious definition and detail at a rate like there's no tomorrow, but ask it to do anything more than that and it falls flat on the face.

Now I've not played LA Noire (yet), but I would *guess* that the scenes where facial expressions play an important role, the rest of the frame is pretty much static (meaning static camera angle, static animations, etc), no other "cpu brainwork" going on at the same time?


Last edited by Beamboom on 5/21/2011 5:33:45 AM

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Lawless SXE
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 5:54:26 AM

Hmm... Just doing a bit of reading, and it seems as though you are right, but not on the console end of things. The MScan technology creates 1 gigabyte of data per SECOND, and is sent through nine computer servers, each capable of processing 300 mB per second. This allows for the instant recreation of the performances.

However there is a flaw in the camera setup, as it cannot record the minute details if too much gross movement is involved, and so requires the actor to remain relatively still.

For this information and more, presented in a far more clear way than I could ever hope to do, visit this link:
http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/motionscan-technology.htm
Peace.

P.S. As for what you have to say about the in-game animations, THAT is something that I have no argument with. There really is a lack of fluidity in the way that characters move because of a distinct lack processing power. Don't get me wrong, the consoles of today are capable of incredible things (just take a look at the layered animation used in the Uncharted series), but don't come close to being able to accurately portray the most subtle nuances of human movement. With every move we make, we adjust to our surroundings, and what pressures are working on our bodies, but the static animations of games, and even animated films usually fail to capture that.

There is a lot of potential for further development and focus on this area in the future, but I feel that most video game developers will eschew this approach in favour of bettering their core graphics, and leaving us more stunned by the immediate effects, rather than the ones that lie beneath the surface. I'll be glad to be proven wrong on this last point, but I also can't deny the appeal of bringing other processor intensive elements, such as real-time ray tracing or more advanced AI systems, to act as a focal point for future development.

Last edited by Lawless SXE on 5/21/2011 6:07:38 AM

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Beamboom
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 6:32:15 AM

It's a very good point you make when mentioning animated films - cause that's even pre-rendered (of course). That just goes to show the *immense* complexity of this task.

Another example on the opposite end of the scale:
Boobs.
Yes.
Think of all the gorgeous boobs in games over the years. And then think of all the attempts that's been made to make them actually *move*.
Through all these years and with an endless stream of boobs in all shapes and forms, they *still* have not been able to make them move in a natural way. Two spineless lumps of fat!
If anything they bump like some concrete blocks strapped on a mans chest. And that's not cause they did not *try*...!

They may have a slight challenge in harvesting the data today, but the problems do not end there my friend. The consoles are not even able to *look* at the harvested data.


Last edited by Beamboom on 5/21/2011 6:40:28 AM

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Lawless SXE
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 6:43:06 AM

All I can say to that is THUMBS UP! (maybe something else too... :P)

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Excelsior1
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 5:24:41 AM
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very interesting coments above. is it a glimpse of the future? i don't know. it seems to be a very time intensive process, and some developers have said they aren't going to use it for various reasons.

i eagerly await the next round of consoles. when you consider the memory contraints developers are dealing with it's pretty amazing what they have pulled off.

one last thing. cograts to team bondi for deliviring the 1st r* game that is not gimped on the ps3. the ps3 version is superior without the resolution cuts and frame rate problems we have seen in r*'s past ps3 games. good job.

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nath08
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 1:26:25 PM
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before i played the game i thought that the faces wouldnt really matter as much as people made out, but they really do, without it, you probably couldnt beat half the cases on the game, im really surprised!

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Danny007
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 6:22:02 PM
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I think L.A. Noire is a glimpse of the now. It definetly looks good and plays well. I hope more games use this technology.

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FM23
Saturday, May 21, 2011 @ 8:09:10 PM
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The technology behind the animation and maybe the drama, but I hope the open world gameplay isn't...like Ben said in the review, it is both outdated and repetitive like most Rockstar games. Why does Rockstar make so many open world games yet you can't interact with anything in it. Look at Fallout,you can interact with everything. Rockstar needs to take this approach because RDR, GTAIV, and LA Noire are nothing but eye candy and nothing more when it comes to open world complexity. But then again, thats not the point of their games anyway so yeah, but it would be nice to actaully interact with the world and the people in it...much like Fallout. Why can't I talk to Bonni in RDR after her missions are over or why can't I go revisit Brucie after we finish a mission. Yeah, this is just a random rant, but think of the possibilities, but then again...its just a game so this isn't really that serious. Either way, this game is a glimpse into the future and Rockstar, even though multiplatform always seem to deliver games that outstrip there competitor. Plus, they are making all around maturer games this generation. I grew up with Rockstar and Rockstar seem to be growing up with me too...lol

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SmokeyPSD
Sunday, May 22, 2011 @ 2:53:12 PM
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As great as the motionscan process is I think what was already achieved in various ways in Avatar and various other projects this process in the end will have a small stint. Full motion scan is the real objective for the industry. To capture a wholistic performance in one go.

It's impressive speficially for L.A. Noire but I just don't see much of a future for it outside of a few individual projects in the coming years. Full body capture is already being explored.

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Qubex
Sunday, May 22, 2011 @ 9:37:08 PM
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"Is L.A. Noire A Glimpse Of The Future?" - Pretty much so, with some Heavy Rain thrown in for good measure...

Q!

"play.experience.enjoy"

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Lairfan
Monday, May 23, 2011 @ 5:38:32 PM
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This is only a glimpse of the near future IMO. There are a couple games with this kind of mocap that are coming out soon, including AC:Revelations (which is said to be able to take the performance of a person who can look completely different from a character, and transpose their acting onto that character's face), Uncharted 3 (without the advanced facial capture, seeing as how ND likes to manually do that), and apparently QD's as-of-yet unrevealed game.

So these kinds of performance capture will probably be pretty common fairly soon. The next step will be how the technology evolves with the next gen.

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